Don’t Stay in School

The sentence “Don’t Stay in School” is jarring to those of us who grew up with the words “stay in school” being thrown at us from every direction. The campaign isn’t about people leaving school, but questioning school subjects. When was the last time you sat down and thought, why do we learn what we learn in school? I recently watched the video below and asked myself that very question.

Public school, in it’s k-12 format is supposed to teach people how to be citizens in the society they live in. The skills they need to survive as adults should be learned before they become adults. Is that the case in Alberta? From what I remember of my public education, I don’t think it is.

As the video mentions, I don’t remember being taught how to do my taxes. Money and trade is the foundation of our modern economy, and it’s not in the core classes. Lots of people have their lives ruined by predatory lending every year because these people don’t understand compound interest. Essential financial skills for an adult in Canada are:

  • Paying taxes
  • Understanding lending rates
  • How to manage a budget

So lets teach these skills. Lets make sure kids have mastered these skills, not spend an afternoon looking at some slides.

We should be teaching kids skills that they will used everyday, along side the skills that they can use to better their lives.

People are becoming adults today and they believe that vaccines are bad. This shows a tremendous lack of understanding when it comes to scientific literacy and statistics. These people may have memorized facts, but they have no idea what the data behind those facts mean. It an increasingly data driven world, we need people to understand what the data means. For examples of misunderstanding data, google climate change.

What about something as simple as driving? Why isn’t defensive driving taught in school? Even if you are never going to get behind the wheel of a car in your life, you will walk on a sidewalk. Knowing how to drive would keep you safe while interacting with vehicles. There were over 120,000 injuries from motor vehicle accidents in Canada in 2012. There are cars everywhere in our cities, why aren’t we teaching kids how to change a tire and check the oil? Shouldn’t all of our citizens know if the vehicle they drive everyday is safe to do so?

We need to get everyone to a base line where they can interact with the world we live in. We are not doing that. We owe it to our future to teach our children skills they can use to navigate their lives. You can always take advanced courses later in life, but it becomes very difficult to do so with massive debt due to the misunderstanding of how credit cards work.

 

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