My Mars One Relationship

A recent article by Rae Paoletta got me thinking about Mars One again. She does a very good job of laying out the difficulties Mars One has had, and stay mostly neutral before slanting to the obvious negative angle. I have a complicated relationship with Mars One that isn’t as negative as everyone else’s and I wanted to explain why.

Do I think Mars One is going to make it to Mars? No.
Do I think Mars One is a scam? No.

I’m Canadian. This means in order to work for NASA or it’s contractors I need an ITAR clearance before I can be hired. While not impossible, it’s lengthily and costly. Anyone who needs to get clearance better be worth the trouble, and compared to the Canadians who are, I am not. I’m middle of the road, and middle of the road does not get special consideration. I had been fascinated with Mars since I was a kid, but there was no clear path as to how I could become a part of a Mars mission. I was terrible at school and there were zero space opportunities that I could see from Western Canada.

When I hear about Mars One in 2011, before it was even asking for applications, I was apprehensive and interested. In Rae’s article she outlines many of the technical issues that Mars One had failed to address, and this was already apparent in their very early days. However, they were making bold claims, and they were not based in the US, and did not require ITAR. This meant that I had a shot. I put in an application without any real hope of making it. In 2013 I was told that I had made it.

Mars One: Round Two

Mars One, for all it’s faults, did instill me with confidence that I could be part of a Mars mission. After this announcement I had many interviews, put on public talks to hundreds of people, applied to the International Space University This began the planning of my trajectory to Mars. For me, Mars One wasn’t the end, but the beginning. It was my foot in the door to the space community. It wasn’t a very good foot in the door as the program was ubiquitously shunned in the space community, but it was more than I had before.

Mars One did one amazing feat, and that was bringing Mars settlement into the public sphere. I do not believe popular culture would be as accepting of Mars as it is without Mars One. Andy Weir’s novel The Martian was self published in 2011 and was picked up by a publisher in 2014. I think it would have taken a lot longer had the public not been acclimatized to Mars via new coverage of Mars One.

I have a complicated relationship with Mars One. I don’t think it’s a scam. I think they are completely honest in their drive to get to Mars, I just don’t think they have the skill to do it. I also don’t think they deserve all the bad press they get. They are honestly trying, and to put them down means that other, more capable people may shy away from trying their ideas. Without Mars One, I wouldn’t be where I am today. They may not get me to Mars, but they are the catalyst that started my journey.

 

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